Lithops Scrapbook III

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Lithops Scrapbook III

L. julii subsp. fulleri var. brunnea as photographed in habitat by the author. Look closely.

 

 

The project continues when you turn the page.

 

Introduction

This is a continuation of the Lithops Scrapbook project, and it exists to prevent Lithops Scrapbook II from becoming over complicated to navigate. Exactly the same principles are followed here.

 

Abbreviations

Abbreviations used throughout the text include:-

  • C = Cole (Lithops colony) number
  • ‘Cole’88’ = D.T. COLE, LITHOPS - FLOWERING STONES (1988)
  • ‘Cole’05’ = D.T.& N.A. COLE, LITHOPS - FLOWERING STONES (2005)
  • “Cole monographs” = both of the above books combined
  • G- (type ‘acf’) = "instances of plants which lack their normal pigmentation and have an unusually green or yellow green basic colour" (‘Cole’88’ p. 83), written as “YG” in ‘Cole’88’.
  • I.C.B.N. or Botanical Code = International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (this became the “International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants” in 2011)
  • I.C.N. or Botanical Code = International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (formerly the “International Code of Botanical Nomenclature")
  • I.C.N.C.P. or Cultivar Code = International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants
  • L. = Lithops
  • M.S.G. = Mesemb. Study Group
  • M.S.G. Bulletin = Quarterly publication of the M.S.G.
  • R-(type ‘acf’) = “red mutant” (‘Cole’05’ p. 14), simply written as “R” in ‘Cole’88’.
  • ‘Shimada (2001)’ = YASUHIKO SHIMADA – THE GENUS LITHOPS (2001)
  • subsp. = subspecies, subspecies
  • var. = varietas, variety
  • W-(type ‘acf’) = "instances of white flowers in species which are normally yellow flowering" (‘Cole‘88’ p. 83), written as “A” in ‘Cole’88’.
  • Y-(type 'acf') = instances of yellow flowers on normally white flowering Lithops (‘Cole’05’ p. 67)
  • * = invalid, unestablished or excluded name, number or status.

Photographic images are reproduced with the permission of the © holders. Text and author photographs © Keith Green.

 

Lithops Scrapbook III preamble

In 2021 it became necessary to introduce Lithops Scrapbook 3 so as to make the wider Lithops Scrapbook project, which began in the 1992, easier to follow and to accommodate a sudden plethora of information from Japan.

Much has changed in society since 1992, not least the rise of greenhouse culture in the Far East and an increased reliance on computer based technology. Whilst this brings benefits, it has also become all too easy to invent fictitious cultivar names or sell seed of dubious identity. Serious growers and fellow students of the genus are therefore urged not to take everything at face value and to check for facts, especially before parting with money.

For all its benefits, easy access to global satellite positioning systems has also been of assistance to poachers. It is a sad reflection on our species that so much of the natural world is regarded as free to plunder for financial profit. The recent large scale removal of habitat plants is despicable and I only hope the culprits are one day brought to justice. Those involved in illegal poaching at any level need to be exposed, shamed and prosecuted. Although the chances of adequate punishment seem remote, it is our duty to do all we can so save what remains of the natural world.

The inappropriate use of “C” numbers also needs to be addressed. “C” numbers or “Cole collection numbers” are those given to particular localities (or colonies) by the Coles’ alone, where historically and legally they collected specimens of Lithops. Only Lithops seed or plants thus collected, or specimens grown from seed produced directly from those plants may sport C-numbers. Plants and seed offered for sale today are many generations removed from the original source so cannot be pure. The invention of new “C” numbers sporting letters to denote aberrations such as *”C54A” for example is also inappropriate. The use of “ex-C??” is however acceptable should an individual so wish. This is a direct request from Naureen Cole.

 

L. bromfieldii var. glaudinae 'Embers’
photograph © Eric Collins.

While all “SCRAPBOOKLITHOPS” notes are presented as facts either researched by or presented to the author, I think it possible some greenhouse produced cultivars are of undocumented hybrid origin.

Maintaining Cole principles, the following are Lithops that were validly published in accordance with the I.C.N. (formerly the I.C.B.N.) or established in accordance with the I.C.N.C.P. subsequent to Lithops Scrapbook II.

 

Lithops Classification

The classification system here remains firmly based on that presented by Cole & Cole in 2005.

Newly introduced Lithops are highlighted here with blue links. Lithops highlighted in brown are noted in Lithops Scrapbook I (viewable & downloadable from this web site) and Lithops highlighted solely in bold are noted in Lithops Scrapbook II (also viewable from this web site). The Lithops written in standard font are the base plants described in the "Cole monographs" and noted in the basics section of this website.

The following is a list of all accepted plants within the Lithops genus.

Lithops N.E.Br.

  • amicorum D.T.Cole
  • amicorum D.T.Cole ‘Freckled Friend’
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Betty’s Beryl'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Corona'
  • aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiaeD.T.Cole ‘Halo’
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Jackson’s Jade'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Rudesheim Ruby’
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Storms's Snowcap'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. koelemanii (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. euniceae
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. euniceae ‘Bellaketty’
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. euniceae 'Hikoruby'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole

 

  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole 'Chieruby'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole ‘Gariep Juweel’
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole 'Mado-Chieruby'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole 'Mado-Yogetugyoku'
  • aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole ‘Spotted Dog’
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. bromfieldii
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. bromfieldii ‘Noemie's Kiwi’
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. bromfieldii ‘White Nymph’
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. glaudinae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. glaudinae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole ‘Embers’
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. insularis (L.Bol.) B.Fearn
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. insularis (L.Bol.) B.Fearn 'Sulphurea'
  • bromfieldii L.Bol. var. mennellii (L.Bol.) B.Fearn
  • bromfieldii L.Bol.‘Red Coral’
  • ‘Chinchillas ZW’
  • coleorum S.A.Hammer & Uijs
  • coleorum S.A.Hammer & Uijs ‘Lindsey Deaves’
  • comptonii L.Bol. var. comptonii
  • comptonii L.Bol. var. weberi (Nel) D.T.Cole
  • dinteri Schwant. subsp. dinteri var. dinteri
  • dinteri Schwant. subsp. dinteri var. dinteri 'Dintergreen'
  • dinteri Schwant. subsp. dinteri var. brevis (L.Bol.) B.Fearn
  • dinteri Schwant. subsp. frederici (D.T.Cole) D.T.Cole
  • dinteri Schwant. subsp. multipunctata (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole

 

  • divergens L.Bol. var. divergens
  • divergens L.Bol. var. divergens ‘Pearl Blush’
  • divergens L.Bol. var. amethystina H.W.deBoer
  • divergens L.Bol. var. amethystina H.W.deBoer 'Sunny Grassland ZW'
  • dorotheae Nel
  • dorotheae Nel 'Akahada Reikogyoku'
  • dorotheae Nel 'Kihada Reikogyoku'
  • dorotheae Nel 'Zorro'
  • francisci Dint. & Schwant.
  • fulviceps (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. fulviceps
  • fulviceps (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. fulviceps 'Aurea'
  • fulviceps (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. lactinea D.T.Cole
  • fulviceps (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. laevigata D.T.Cole
  • gesinae H.W.de Boer var. gesinae
  • gesinae H.W.de Boer var. annae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole
  • gesinae H.W.de Boer var. annae (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole ‘Hanawared’
  • geyeri Nel
  • geyeri Nel 'White Silk'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Café au lait'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Ernst's Witkop'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Snow Fog'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Paw Pads'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Vein'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. waldroniae H.W.de Boer
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. waldroniae H.W.de Boer 'Fritz's White Lady'
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. brandbergensis
  • gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. brandbergensis ‘Vertigo’
  • gracilidelineata Dint. 'Brandcafé'
  • 'Grain Rain ZW'

 

  • hallii H.W.de Boer var. hallii
  • hallii H.W.de Boer var. hallii 'Black Spiderweb'
  • hallii H.W.de Boer var. hallii 'Sakkie's Green'
  • hallii H.W.de Boer var. ochracea (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • hallii H.W.de Boer var. ochracea (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole 'Green Soapstone'
  • ‘Harlequin’
  • helmutii L.Bol.
  • hermetica D.T.Cole
  • hermetica D.T.Cole ‘Green Diamond’
  • herrei L.Bol.
  • herrei L.Bol. 'Splendido'
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. hookeri
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. hookeri 'Envy'
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. dabneri (L.Bol.) D.T.Cole
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. dabneri (L.Bol.) D.T.Cole ‘Annarosa’
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. elephina (D.T.Cole) D.T.Cole
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. lutea (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. lutea (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole 'Aubarede'
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. marginata (Nel) D.T.Cole
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. marginata (Nel) D.T.Cole 'Shimada's Apricot'
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. subfenestrata (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. susannae (D.T.Cole) D.T.Cole
  • hookeri (Berg.) Schwant. var. susannae (D.T.Cole) D.T.Cole 'White Susan'

 

  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii ‘Chatora’
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii ‘Honey Lips ZW’
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii 'Hotlips'
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii 'Peppermint Creme'
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii ‘Red Reticulata’
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii ‘Yukari’
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii 'Yunmeng Lake ZW'
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. fulleri
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. fulleri 'Fullergreen'
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. fulleri ‘Limelight’
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. brunnea H.W.de Boer
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. rouxii (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. rouxii (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole 'Green Stitch'
  • julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. ‘Nine Rivers ZW’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana ‘Rosary’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana ‘Lateritia’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana ‘Opalina’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana ‘Top Red’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. aiaisensis (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. aiaisensis (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole ‘Orange Ice’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. immaculata D.T.Cole

 

  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana (Dint. &Schwant.) D.T.Cole
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana (Dint. &Schwant.) D.T.Cole 'Lerichegreen’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana (Dint. & Schwant.) D.T.Cole 'Mado-Shugengyoku'
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana var. tischeri D.T.Cole
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. bella (N.E.Br.) D.T.Cole
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. bella (N.E.Br.) D.T.Cole 'Cascade'
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. bella (N.E.Br.) D.T.Cole 'Ironstone'
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. eberlanzii (Dint. & Schwant.) D.T.Cole
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. eberlanzii (Dint. & Schwant.) D.T.Cole 'Avocado Cream'
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. eberlanzii (Dint. & Schwant.) D.T.Cole ‘Purper’
  • karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. 'Axel's Rose'
  • ‘Kikukaseki’
  • ‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’
  • ‘Kosogyoku’
  • ‘Lava Flow’
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Albiflora'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Albinica'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Cherry'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Fred’s Redhead’
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Green Top'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Hanabi'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Pietersruby'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Storm's Albinigold'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var hornii H.W.de Boer

 

  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. hornii H.W.de Boer 'Greenhorn'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. mariae D.T.Cole
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. mariae D.T.Cole 'Mariagreen'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. minor H.W.de Boer
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. minor H.W.de Boer 'Witblom'
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. rubrobrunnea H.W.de Boer
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. venteri (Nel) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. venteri (Nel) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom ‘Black Top’
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. venteri (Nel) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom ‘Pepper Pot’
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. venteri (Nel) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom ‘Ventergreen’
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. burchellii D.T.Cole
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei ‘South Lake ZW’
  • lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. ‘Sage Sun’s Hairs -ZW-’
  • marmorata (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. marmorata
  • marmorata (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. marmorata 'Golden Mane'
  • marmorata (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. marmorata 'Polepsky Smaragd'
  • marmorata (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. elisae (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • meyeri L.Bol.
  • meyeri L.Bol. 'Hammeruby'
  • ‘Moss Agate’
  • 'Murasaki-Kikukaeski’
  • 'Murasaki-Kikushogyoku’
  • naureeniae D.T.Cole
  • ‘Nuwa Stone ZW’
  • olivacea L.Bol. var. olivacea
  • olivacea L.Bol. var. olivacea ‘Angel's of Tony’
  • olivacea L.Bol. var. olivacea D.T.Cole 'Voldemort's Visage'
  • olivacea L.Bol. var. nebrownii D.T.Cole
  • olivacea L.Bol. var. nebrownii D.T.Cole 'Red Olive'
  • optica (Marl.) N.E.Br.
  • optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. 'Opticagold'
  • optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. 'Rubra'
  • optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. ‘Rubragold’

 

  • optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. 'Rubra Henge'
  • optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. ‘Ruby’
  • otzeniana Nel
  • otzeniana Nel 'Aquamarine'
  • otzeniana Nel 'Cesky Granat'
  • otzeniana Nel. 'Frik Green'
  • otzeniana Nel. 'Frik Grey'
  • otzeniana Nel. 'Midori-Otsue'
  • otzeniana Nel. 'Yamato Granat'
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella 'Albiflora'
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella ‘Springbloom’
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. elisabethiae (Dint.) H.W.deBoer &B.K. Boom
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. elisabethiae (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K. Boom ‘White Queen’
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. riehmerae D.T.Cole
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. pseudotruncatella var. riehmerae D.T.Cole ‘Green Ivory’
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. archerae (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. archerae (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole 'Kegon'
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. archerae (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole 'Split Pea'
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. dendritica (Nel) D.T.Cole
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. groendrayensis (Jacobs.) D.T.Cole
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. schoemanii R.A.Earlẻ & R.R.J.Uijs
  • pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. volkii (Schwant. ex H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom) D.T.Cole
  • ruschiorum (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. var. ruschiorum
  • ruschiorum (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. var. ruschiorum ‘Silver Reed’
  • ruschiorum (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. var. lineata (Nel) D.T.Cole

 

  • salicola L.Bol.
  • salicola L.Bol. ‘Daikangyoku’
  • salicola L.Bol. 'Malachite'
  • salicola L.Bol. 'Sato’s Violet'
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. schwantesii
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. schwantesii 'Purple Haze'
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. marthae (Loesch & Dint.) D.T.Cole
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. rugosa (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. rugosa (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom 'Blue Moon'
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. rugosa (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom 'Shagreen'
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom 'Bethanien Green’
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom 'Nutwerk'
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis (Dint.) H.W.de Boer & B.K.Boom 'Witspook'
  • schwantesii Dint. subsp. gebseri (H.W.deBoer) D.T.Cole
  • ‘Silwersalm’
  • steineckeana Tisch.
  • ‘Sunflowers ZW’
  • ‘Sunstone’
  • ‘Talisman’
  • terricolor N.E.Br.
  • terricolor N.E.Br. ‘Chocolate Sprinkles’
  • terricolor N.E.Br. ‘Green Sandpoort’
  • terricolor N.E.Br. ‘Pinky’
  • terricolor N.E.Br. 'Silver Spurs'
  • terricolor N.E.Br. 'Speckled Gold'
  • terricolor N.E.Br. 'Steamy Windows'

 

 

 

Key to authors

Berg. = Berger, Alwyn; H.W.de Boer = de Boer, Hindrik Wijbrand; L.Bol. = Bolus, Harriet Margaret Louisa; B.K.Boom = Boom, Boudewijn Karel; N.E.Br. = Brown, Nicholas Edward; D.T.Cole = Cole, Desmond Thorne; Dint. = Dinter, Moriz Kurt; R.A.Earlẻ = Earlẻ, Roy Anthony; B.Fearn = Fearn, Brian; S.A.Hammer = Hammer, Steven Allen; Jacobs. = Jacobsen, Hermann Johannes; Loesch = Loesch, Alfred; H.Luckh. = Luckhoff, Hilmar Albert; Marl. = Marloth, Hermann Wilhelm Rudolf; Nel = Nel, Gert Cornelius; Schwant. = Schwantes, Martin Heinrich Gustav; Tisch. = Tischer, Arthur; Uijs & R.R.J.Uijs = Uijs, Ronald Rousseau Jan.

Lithops N.E.Br. aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Corona’. (cultivar)

Lithops aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Corona’. Established by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Photograph bottom right on P. 81 of THE GENUS LITHOPS (2001) taken by Yashukio Shimada of Japan. A cultivar with dark open windows void of islands.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar identical to var. aucampiae in all respects other than having dark, fully open windows that are void of islands. Although long traded and depicted on page 81 of ‘Shimada (2001)’ with a bracketed “Katakana script” title, formal publication was by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). ‘Corona’ has wider margins and darker windows than ‘Halo’, a cultivar once considered synonymous by some.

 

L. aucampiae subsp./var. aucampiae 'Corona'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W. de Boer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole ‘Mado-Chieruby’. (cultivar)

Lithops aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis ‘Mado-Chieruby’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 3, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. An orange-red bodied cultivar with dark, wide open windows.

 

 

This is a stabilised strain of the orange-red var. fluminalis ‘Chieruby’ with dark, wide open windows and only small vestiges of islands, if any. It was selectively bred the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). . There it was explained “mado” is Japanese for “window”. The flower colour is the standard yellow for the species.

 

L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis 'Mado-Chieruby'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. aucampiae L.Bol. subsp. euniceae (H.W. de Boer) D.T.Cole var. fluminalis D.T.Cole ‘Mado-Yogetugyoku’. (cultivar)

Lithops aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis ‘Mado-Yogetugyoku’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 4, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A var. fluminalis with dark open windows.

 

 

This is a stabilised strain of var. fluminalis with dark, wide open windows and only small vestiges of islands, if any. It was selectively bred the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, has long been traded in the Far East and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). It is the var. aucampiae equivalent of ‘Corona’ and accordingly has yellow flowers.

 

L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis 'Mado-Yogetugyoku'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. dorotheae Nel ‘Akahada Reikogyoku’'. (cultivar)

Lithops dorotheae ‘Akahada Reikogyoku’’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 5, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A red flushed L. dorotheae.

 

 

This is a red flushed L. dorotheae that was developed at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan from plants donated by H. W. de Boer of the Netherlands in 1963. A photograph of one of the forerunners of this cultivar was shown on p. 99 of ‘Shimada (2001)’, and it has long been traded as *”Red Type” in the Far East. The plants were eventually established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021), where it was explained the epithet translates from Japanese into English as “red-bodied dorotheae”. Other than colour, ‘Akahada Reikogyoku’ is identical to normal L. dorotheae.

 

L. dorotheae 'Akahada Reikogyoku'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. dorotheae Nel ‘Kihada Reikogyoku’'. (cultivar)

Lithops dorotheae ‘Kihada Reikogyoku’’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 6, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A yellow bodied L. dorotheae.

 

 

This is a yellow bodied, often pale yellow L. dorotheae that was developed at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan from plants donated to Yasuhiko Shimada by Emile Heunis of South Africa. The plants have long been traded as *"EH dorotheae” in Japan, but were eventually established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). ‘Kihada Reikogyoku’ translates from Japanese into English as “yellow-bodied dorotheae”, and in all but colour this cultivar is identical to normal L. dorotheae.

 

L. dorotheae 'Kihada Reikogyoku'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. geyeri Nel ‘White Silk’. (cultivar)

Lithops geyeri ‘White Silk’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 7, accompanying the protologue taken by Tetsuro Ikeda of Japan. A white flowering L. geyeri.

 

 

This is white flowering or W-(type ’acf’) of L. geyeri, a species that usually produces yellow flowers with white centres. Although this mutation has occurred previously, no formal description has been forthcoming. ‘White Silk’ arose in the collection of Tetsuro Ikeda in Japan, who eventually stabilised the trait, and the epithet was eventually established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). The somewhat dainty plant bodies of L. geyeri ‘White Silk’ distinguish it from the similar L. marmorata var. marmorata. This cultivar is identified by flower colour alone.

 

L. geyeri 'White Silk'
photograph © Tetsuro Ikeda.

Lithops N.E.Br. gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata ‘Paw Pads’. (cultivar)

Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata ‘Paw Pads’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, 38(4): 328-329. (December) 2021”. Image example: Fig. 8, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A monstrous multi-lobed cultivar.

L. gracilidelineata subsp./var. gracilidelineata 'Paw Pads'
X2 photographs © Norihiko Shimada.

This is a monstrous form of var. gracilidelineata. It originated from ex-C374 stock at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Although vegetative propagation is currently necessary, it may be possible to maintain the trait through seed production in future. Other than the multi-lobed body form, this cultivar is identical to normal specimens and accordingly flowers yellow.

 

Lithops N.E.Br. gracilidelineata Dint. subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata ‘Vein’. (cultivar)

Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata ‘Vein’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 9, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A cultivar with facial markings resembling an insect wing.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar with a fine, continuous reticulated pattern on the face that resembles an insect wing. It originated from ex-C373 stock at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Other than the ornate facial pattern this cultivar is identical to normal specimens and accordingly flowers yellow.

 

L. gracilidelineata subsp./var. gracilidelineata 'Vein'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. hallii H.W.de Boer var. hallii ‘Black Spiderweb’. (cultivar)

Lithops hallii var. hallii ‘Black Spiderweb’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Japan Succulent Society Journal, 526: 2. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 10 of “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”, taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A var. hallii with contrasting dark and light colours.

L. hallii var. hallii 'Black Spiderweb'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

This is a pattern bred cultivar with dark windows that contrast markedly with much lighter, small grey islands and plant bodies. Although it is not the case, the overall effect is suggestive of black and white plants. Specimens originated from Sakkie Saaiman of South Africa, were further refined by the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan and established by Norihiko Shimada in Japan Succulent Society Journal vol. 526 p. 2 (2021). Other than the contrasting “silent movie” shades, the plants are identical to L. hallii var. hallii and accordingly flower white.

 

L. hallii var. hallii 'Black Spiderweb'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br subsp. julii ‘Chatora’. (cultivar)

Lithops julii subsp. julii ‘Chatora’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 16, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A cultivar with opaque white-brown bodies and dark brown reticulations.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar described as having an “opaque white-brown body with dark brown reticulations”. At first glance it resembles some normal reticulate forms, but the contrast between the bold, uniform channels and the much lighter islands, margins and plant bodies set it apart. It was developed by the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan from plants gifted to Yashuhiko Shimada by Ernst Fritz in 1984, and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). There it was explained “chatora” is a Japanese word for a cat with brown stripes. The flower colour is the standard white of the species.

 

L. julii subsp. julii 'Chatora'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. julii ‘Yukari’. (cultivar)

Lithops julii subsp. julii ‘Yukari’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021. Image example: Fig. 15, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A purple bodied subsp. julii.

 

 

This is a purple bodied cultivar of subsp. julii developed by the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Other than the vibrant purple colours these plants are identical to normal subsp. julii. They vary in their facial patterns and look resplendent when the standard white flower of the species emerges.

 

L. julii subsp. julii 'Yukari'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. julii (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. fulleri (N.E.Br.) B.Fearn var. rouxii (H.W.de Boer) D.T.Cole ‘Green Stitch’. (cultivar)

Lithops julii subsp. fulleri var. rouxii ‘Green Stitch’. First published by Norihiko Shimada in “Lithops, Japan Succulent Society Journal 512: 14. (December) 2018”. Image example: Fig. 10, accompanying the protologue on the back page taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A var. rouxii with radiant green outer patterns.

L. julii subsp. fulleri var. rouxii 'Green Stitch'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

This is a stabilised strain of var. rouxii with a subtle green colour concentrated around the margins. It originated from the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) and was in Japanese cultivation for some time before being known to the “west”. It was established by Norihiko Shimada in the Japan Succulent Society Journal vol. 515, p. 14 (2018), where the description was in Japanese. The stitch-like markings so distinctive in var. rouxii seem particularly ornate in this otherwise normal, white flowering cultivar.

 

L. julii subsp. fulleri var. rouxii 'Green Stitch'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. karasmontana (H.W. de Boer) D.T.Cole var. lericheana (Dint. & Schwant.) D.T.Cole ‘Mado-Shugengyoku’. (cultivar)

Lithops karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana ‘Mado-Shugengyoku’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 17, accompanying the protologue taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. A cultivar with open brown windows and a pinkish plant body.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar with wide open brownish windows on a pinkish plant body, giving an overall pastel effect. It originated from the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). There it was explained “mado” is Japanese for “window”. The flower colour is the standard white for the species.

 

L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana 'Mado-Shugengyoku'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. karasmontana (Dint. & Schwant.) N.E.Br. subsp. bella D.T.Cole ‘Cascade'. (cultivar)

Lithops karasmontana subsp. bella ‘Cascade’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 18, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A variegated subsp. bella.

This is a stabilised, variegated subsp. bella, developed from ex-C285 stock at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Other than the variegations which are concentrated on the sides, ‘Cascade’ is identical to normal subsp. bella.

 

L. karasmontana subsp. bella 'Cascade'
X2 photographs © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Green Top’. (cultivar)

Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Green Top’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 19, accompanying the protologue taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. A green-bodied, yellow flowering cultivar with narrow margins and wide open windows void of islands.

 

 

This is a green bodied, yellow flowering cultivar with wide open windows that either lack islands completely or have only tiny islet vestiges. It originated from the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, where selective breeding from specimens of var. lesliei ‘Storm’s Albinigold’ began in 2009. In all but flower colour it is akin to ‘South Lake ZW’ (as documented in Lithops Scrapbook 2), and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021).

 

L. lesliei subsp./var. lesliei 'Green Top'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Hanabi’. (cultivar)

Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Hanabi’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 20, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A cultivar with dark windows and orange brown markings.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar with dark even black windows and orange-brown markings. It originated from the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, where it was selectively bred from specimens of var. lesliei ex-C27. In all but body colours it is identical to var. lesliei, although reportedly somewhat reluctant to flower. It was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021), where it was explained ‘Hanabi’ is a Japanese sparking firework.

 

L. lesliei subsp./var. lesliei 'Hanabi'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. subsp. lesliei var. mariae D.T.Cole ‘Mariagreen’. (cultivar)

Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. mariae ‘Mariagreen’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 23, accompanying the protologue taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. A yellow-green bodied var. mariae with normal yellow flowers.

L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. mariae 'Mariagreen'
photograph © Eric Collins.

This is a stabilised yellowish-green cultivar or G-(type ‘acf’) of var. mariae. It originated from Sakkie Saaiman of South Africa and was developed at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan before being formally established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Specimens were in cultivation for some years before being formally established, and have appeared spontaneously for other growers. In all respects other than body colour the plants are identical to normal var. mariae and so flower yellow.

 

L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. mariae 'Mariagreen'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. marmorata (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. var. marmorata ‘Golden Mane’. (cultivar)

Lithops marmorata var. marmorata ‘Golden Mane’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 24, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A green bodied var. marmorata with white centred, yellow flowers.

 

 

This is a green bodied, yellow flowering cultivar that arose by chance from a batch of ‘Polepsky Smaragd’ seedlings at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan. Yellow flowers have occasionally been reported to occur spontaneously among batches of var. marmorata, but this particular Y-(type ‘acf’) was selectively cultivated further by Mr. Tetsuro Ikeda, who began the process in 2006. Subsequently ‘Golden Mane’ was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Other than the yellow flowers which also have a white centre, ‘Golden Mane’ is identical to ‘Polepsky Smaragd’.

 

L. marmorata var. marmorata 'Golden Mane'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. ‘Murasaki-Kikukaseki’. (hybrid)

Lithops ‘Murasaki-Kikukaseki’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Bottom fig. p. 48, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A purple bodied subsp. L. ‘Kikukaseki’.

 

 

This is a purple bodied L. ‘Kikukaseki’, a hybrid noted for its coarse, brown facial markings. Highly unstable plants derived from subsp. fulleri crossed with ‘Sato’s Violet’, ‘Kikukaseki’ and probably others, have long been traded under this guise, but are not worthy of the name. However, an intense selection process at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, eventually fixed the features which were established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). “Murasaki” is Japanese for “purple” and the flower colour remains white.

 

L. 'Murasaki-Kikukaseki'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. ‘Murasaki-Kikushogyoku’. (hybrid)

Lithops ‘Murasaki-Kikushogyoku’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. The second part of the epithet was revised from ‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’ by the author. Image example: Top fig. p. 48, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A purple bodied subsp. L. ‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’.

 

 

This is a purple bodied L. ‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’, a hybrid noted for its chrysanthemum patterned face. Highly unstable plants derived from subsp. fulleri crossed with ‘Sato’s Violet’, ‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’ and probably others, have long been traded under this guise, but lack the fine markings and are not worthy of the name. However, an intense selection process at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, eventually fixed the features which were established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). “Murasaki” is Japanese for “purple” and the flower colour remains white.

 

L. 'Murasaki-Kikushogyoku'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. ‘Opticagold’. (cultivar)

Lithops optica ‘Opticagold’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 26, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of japan. A yellow flowering L. optica with normal colour plant bodies.

L. optica 'Opticagold'
X2 photographs © Norihiko Shimada.

This is a yellow flowering or Y-(type ’acf’) of L. optica with normal plant bodies that are often green tinged. It was derived from specimens of the red bodied ‘Rubragold’ at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Whilst ‘Opticagold’ can superficially resemble L. herrei or even L. olivacea, differences at species level remain, of which the distinct margins and lopsided nature of L. optica are usually the most obvious.

 

Lithops N.E.Br. optica (Marl.) N.E.Br. ‘Rubra Henge’. (cultivar)

Lithops optica ‘Rubra Henge’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, 38(4): LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 25, accompanying the protologue taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. A monstrous, red bodied, multi-clumping cultivar.

L. optica 'Rubra Henge''
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

This is a monstrous, multi-clumping cultivar that is identical to L. optica ‘Rubra’ in all but form. The plant bodies start out tri-lobed, but develop with four, five or more leaves growing on the same head. It was stabilised at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Vegetative propagation may be the best way to preserve this cultivar. Norihiko explained in the publication article that translated from English, “henge” means “changes in shape” in Japanese.

 

L. optica 'Rubra Henge''
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. otzeniana Nel ‘Frik Green’. (cultivar)

Lithops otzeniana ‘Frik Green’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, 38(4): LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 28, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A green bodied cultivar with windows reduced to narrow channels.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar where the distinctive, scalloped, marginal markings of the species have been vastly exaggerated on green bodied specimens. The remaining window area has accordingly been reduced to no more than a narrow channel. They were produced from five plants gifted to Mr. Yasuhiko Shimada by Frik du Plooy in South Africa in 1997. It is the pattern and the greenish colour that distinguish this cultivar that was developed by the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). The flower colour is the standard yellow with white centres of L. otzeniana.

 

L. otzeniana 'Frik Green'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. otzeniana Nel ‘Frik Grey’. (cultivar)

Lithops otzeniana ‘Frik Grey’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 27, accompanying the protologue taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. A grey cultivar with windows reduced to narrow channels.

 

 

This is a pattern bred cultivar where the distinctive, scalloped, marginal markings of the species have been vastly exaggerated on grey bodied specimens. The remaining window area has accordingly been reduced to no more than a narrow channel. They were produced from five plants gifted to Mr. Yasuhiko Shimada by Frik du Plooy in South Africa in 1997. It is the pattern and the grey colour that distinguish this cultivar that was developed by the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). The flower colour is the standard yellow with white centres of L. otzeniana.

 

L. otzeniana 'Frik Grey'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. otzeniana Nel ‘Midori-Otsue’. (cultivar)

Lithops otzeniana ‘Midori-Otsue’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Japan Succulent Society Journal, 526 : Title Page. 2021”. Image example: Bottom fig. p. 50 of “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”, taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. A yellow-green bodied cultivar.

 

L. otzeniana 'Midori-Otsue'
photographed by the author.

This is a stabilised yellow-green or G- (type ‘acf’) which for many years was misidentified as ‘Aquamarine’, a name that should only be applied to blueish-green plants. These more prolific true green or yellow green plants were officially split from ‘Aquamarine’ and established by Norihiko Shimada in Japan Succulent Society Journal vol. 526, p. Front cover (2021). Steven Hammer distributed his green-attempts widely and many specimens will have been grown from that. Body colour alone distinguishes ‘Midori-Otsue’ and the epithet translates from Japanese to “green cane”.

 

L. otzeniana 'Midori-Otsue'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. otzeniana Nel ‘Yamato Granat’. (cultivar)

Lithops otzeniana ‘Yamato Granat’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 29, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A pink bodied L. otzeniana.

This is a pattern bred cultivar derived from ‘Cesky Granat’, with a stable "fluorescent" or powder pink colour that persists all year. It originated from the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). As for the species the flower colour is yellow with white centres, and broadly speaking the epithet means “Japanese garnet”.

 

L. otzeniana 'Yamato Granat'
X2 photographs © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. pseudotruncatella (Berg.) N.E.Br. subsp. archerae ‘Kegon’. (cultivar)

Lithops pseudotruncatella subsp. archerae ‘Kegon’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 30, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A variegated subsp. archerae.

 

 

This is a stabilised, variegated subsp. archerae that originated from the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan, from ex-C306 stock. Although depicted on the front cover of issue 469 of the Japan Succulent Society Journal in 2011, the plants were not there described. The variegations and the tendency to grow somewhat taller than normal subsp. archerae, set ‘Kegon’ apart. It was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021), where it was explained ‘Kegon’ relates to a beautiful Japanese water fall.

 

L. pseudotruncatella subsp.archerae 'Kegon'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. verruculosa Nel var. verruculosa ‘Chrysoberyl’. (cultivar)

Lithops verruculosa var. verruculosa ‘Chrysoberyl’. First published by Norihiko Shimada in “Lithops, Japan Succulent Society Journal 512: 14. (December) 2018”. Image example: Fig. 11, accompanying the protologue on the back page taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A yellow-green var. verruculosa.

L. verruculosa var. verruculosa 'Chrysoberyl'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Relatively unknown for a good while outside of Japan, this is a YG or G- (type ‘acf’) that was established by Norihiko Shimada in the Japan Succulent Society Journal vol. 515, p. 14 (2018), in Japanese. It stems from ex-C229B stock and differs from the ex-C159 cultivars ‘Verdigris’ and the greener forms of ‘Rose of Texas’ by having a stronger yellow colouration, more pronounced red verruculae and a greater tendency to a reniform (kidney) shape. Whilst variable flower colours are always possible in this species, it is also highly unlikely this cultivar will produce anything approaching pink flowers. The epithet ‘Chrysoberyl’ stems from a type of mineral that can be quite yellow and is sometimes used in the gem trade.

 

L. verruculosa var. verruculosa 'Chrysoberyl'
photograph © Petr Pavelka.

Lithops N.E.Br. villettii L. Bol. deboeri (Schwant.) D.T.Cole ‘Orihime’. (cultivar)

Lithops villettii subsp. deboeri ‘Orihime’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 33, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A yellow flowering subsp. deboeri.

 

 

This is a yellow flowering or Y-(type’acf’) of subsp. deboeri. A single yellow flowering specimen was first spotted among ex-C230A stock by Yasuhiko Shimada and Tetsuro Ikeda in 2006 and was subsequently developed at the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan. It was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021), where it was explained the epithet ‘Orihime’ derives from Japanese folk law and a “princess who made beautiful cloth”.

 

L. villetti subsp.deboeri 'Orihime'
photograph © Norihiko Shimada.

Lithops N.E.Br. werneri Schwant. & Jacobs ‘Camel’. (cultivar)

Lithops werneri ‘Camel’. Frist published by Norihiko Shimada in “Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen, Kaktusy, LV11 Special (2): 30-50. 2021”. Image example: Fig. 34, accompanying the protologue taken by Norihiko Shimada of japan. A cultivar with a yellowish brown top surface and dark tan reticulations.

L. werneri 'Camel'
X2 photographs © Norihiko Shimada.

This is a pattern bred cultivar with distinctly yellowish brown tops and dark reticulations. It was developed by the Gunsen-en Nursery (the House of Shimada) in Japan and was established by Norihiko Shimada in Kaktusy vol. LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021). Camel-like body colours only distinguish the cultivar, which in all other ways is identical to normal, greyer L. werneri.

 

References

Brickell, C.D., Alexander, C, Cubey, J.J., David, J.C., Hoffman, M.H.A., Leslie, A.C., Malécot, V., Xiaobai Jin. (2016), International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants Ninth Edn. Leuven: International Society for Horticultural Science.

Cole, D.T. (1988) Lithops Flowering Stones. Randburg: Acorn Books.

Cole, D.T. & Cole, N.A. (2005) Lithops Flowering Stones. Milano: Cactus & Co.

Shimada, N. (2011) ‘Photo’, Japan Succulent Society Journal, 469, front cover.

Shimada, N. (2018) ‘Lithops', Japan Succulent Society Journal, 512, p. 14.

Shimada, N. (2021) ‘Lithops', Japan Succulent Society Journal, 526, pp. front cover-2.

Shimada, N. (2021) 'Cultivars from Shimada’s Kitchen', Kaktusy, LV11 Special 2, pp. 30-50 (2021).

Shimada, Y. (2001) The Genus Lithops. Kiryu: Dobun Shoin.

Using the Cole research material for guidance, this Lithops Scrapbook III project will be updated as appropriate.