The International Cultivar Registration Authority Register and Checklist for the genus Lithops N.E.Br.

 

The list that follows is the official checklist and register of Lithops cultivars, in alphabetical order according to cultivar epithet. It was first compiled as a checklist in the (UK) autumn of 2013, but subsequent to that date it is requested that new cultivars be registered using the official form available from the link on the right.

NB. The term “Nomenclatural standard” is used only where a photograph has so been designated; the term “Image example” being used elsewhere. No offence is inferred by the omission or use of personal titles (such as Mr., Mrs., Dr., etc.) which are recorded as researched by, or presented to the registrar. Names attributed to Lithops as personal or casual notations may not appear.

You can download this list for viewing and reference in PDF format (487Kb) here.

Entries in yellow, preceded by an asterisk * are unacceptable cultivar epithets.

The official ISHS Lithops Cultivar register / checklist
‘Albiflora’
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Albiflora'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 163. 1988”. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 219 in Lithops - Flowering Stones 2005. A white flowering cultivar with normal body colours. NB. This Latin form epithet is retained as it is based on L. lesliei f. albiflora (B. Fearn; 1966) which has subsequently become widely known and accepted as a cultivar.
*‘Albiflora’
*L. pseudotruncatella subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella ‘Albiflora’. Appeared on page 62 in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and on page 182 in Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988 by Professor Desmond Cole, although no specimen was believed to exist at either time. In Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988 it was explained that cultivar rank had been given to all such aberrant colour forms in that publication, and that in the interest of continuity var. pseudotruncatella *’Albiflora’ was included. It was only ever known from one specimen and is already in use for L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Albiflora’ above. An unaccepted epithet in this context.
*‘Albiflorus’
*L. bromfieldii var. bromfieldii ‘Albiflorus’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 1997 seed list numbered F013, but with no description. An unaccepted epithet.
*‘Albiflos’
*L. helmutii ‘Albiflos’. This single unacceptable Latin based epithet appeared on the Frik du Plooy 1997 seed list with no description, numbered F060. Frik (personal comment) once indicated that this was probably a hybrid of uncertain origin anyway. An unaccepted epithet.
‘Albinica’
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Albinica'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 163. 1988”, originating from A V Dabner and Peter H Wilkins. Image example: Photograph bottom left on page 163 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised green bodied and white flowering aberration. Vince Formosa of Leeds (personal comment) once indicated that var. lesliei *’Vivid Green', a plant that appeared on the now defunct seed list of “Parkways Lithops” without a written description, was identical to ‘Albinica’ that arose from the Cole collection number C36, but came from Cole collection number C5. NB. This Latin form epithet is retained as it is based on L. lesliei f. albinica (D.T. Cole; 1968) which has subsequently become widely known and accepted as a cultivar.
*’Alpina’
*L. pseudotruncatella ‘Alpina’. This Latin based epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 24(1) pp.3-4 (2009), numbered 2394. Further, and as recorded on page 330 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Alpina’ is not distinct from L. pseudotruncatella subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella.
‘Angels of Tony’
Lithops olivacea var. olivacea ‘Angels of Tony’. First published by Tony Sato in the “Cactus & Succulent Journal of Japan 16(4): 8-11, (Dec) 2001”. Image example: Photograph of flowering cluster accompanying the protologue, taken by Tony Sato of Fukushima City, Japan. A cultivar with flower petals that do not properly unfurl. In colour however, they are the normal yellow with white centres.
‘Annarosa’
Lithops hookeri var. dabneri ‘Annarosa’. First published by Giuseppe Maria Piccione in “Cultivars in lithops, Cactus & Co. 10(2): 115-116. 2006”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook: part 2’, Cactus World, 26 (1), pp. 21-27 p.25, figure 9, 2008, taken by Giuseppe Maria Piccione of Verona, Italy. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
'Aquamarine'
Lithops otzeniana 'Aquamarine'. On the basis of a single specimen this epithet was published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 180: 1988”. Following successful propagation this was accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 96. 1999”. The originators of this cultivar were Professor Desmond Cole and Naureen Cole. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 180 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised bluish grey-green bodied aberration.
’Aubarede'
Lithops hookeri var. lutea ’Aubarede'. First published by Norbert Rebmann in “Un nouveau Lithops, Cactus & Succulentes 6(1): 18-19. (July) 2014", originating from Philippe Richaud. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue taken by Philippe Richaud of France. Aubarede is a quarter of the town Le Cannet near Cannes in southern France where the plants were developed. A stabilised white flowering aberration.
’Aurea'
Lithops fulviceps var.  fulviceps ’Aurea'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones:122. 1988”, originating from Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. Image example: Photograph top left on page 123 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised white flowering, green bodied aberration. Nb. This Latin form epithet is retained as it is based on L. fulviceps f. aurea (Y. Shimada; 1977) which has subsequently become widely known and accepted as a cultivar.
'Avocado Cream'
Lithops karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii 'Avocado Cream'. Published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 160. 1988”. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue on page 160. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
’Axel's Rose'
Lithops karasmontana ’Axel's Rose'. First published by Bernd Schlösser in “The Rose of Axel Neumann, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 29(1): 11. (January) 2014”, originating from Axel Neumann of Irxleben, Germany. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue page 10, figure 29.7, taken by Axel Neumann. A red-purple cultivar that is subsp. karasmontana in shape, but of uncertain subspecies origin.
*’Bacchus’
*L. salicola ‘Bacchus’. An excellent epithet coined by Steven Hammer on page 132 of Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 1999 in honour of “the Greek god of wine”. Unfortunately Steven was unaware at that time the originator, Tony Sato of Japan, had expressed a wish to use the epithet ‘Sato’s Violet’. Synonym of ‘Sato’s Violet’.
‘Bellaketty’
Lithops aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. euniceae ‘Bellaketty’. First published by Giuseppe Maria Piccione in “A new Lithops cultivar, Cactus and Succulent Journal (US): 75(4): 152-153. 2003”. Image example: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 2’, Cactus World, 26 (1): pp. 21-27 page 22, figure 4, 2008, taken by Giuseppe Maria Piccione of Verona, Italy. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
'Betty’s Beryl'
Lithops aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Betty’s Beryl'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 101. 1988”, from plants originating in Johnson’s Cactus Gardens, California, USA. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 100 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988.  A stabilised white flowering, green bodied aberration.
*'Blacktop’
*L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. venteri ‘Blacktop’. The ‘Blacktop’ epithet was first mentioned by Terry Smale (without a description) in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 26, p. 7 (2011) as part of the 2011 seed distribution, numbered 2598. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*'Blue Grey’
*L. schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis ‘Blue Grey’. Appeared (as not available) on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F184. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
'Blue Moon'
Lithops schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. rugosa 'Blue Moon'. First published by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 49. 1995”, originating from Norm Dennis of the USA. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue page 107, figure 217, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A powdery-bluish bodied cultivar.
*'Brakfontein'
*L. otzeniana 'Brakfontein'. A photo of a normal looking L. otzeniana with the title "SH351 'Brakfontein'" was shown on www.geocities.jp/axxrd09/otzeniana.htm . This appears to be an erroneous format, as "Brakfontein" is a place where the species are known to grow. There has been no official publication. An unaccepted epithet.
'Brandcafé'
Lithops gracilidelineata 'Brandcafé'. First published by Terry Smale in “Seed Distribution 2017, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 32(1): 11. (January) 2017”, originating from Steven Hammer. Image example: Photograph on page 22 accompanying the protologue, Fig 32.36, taken by Andy Young of the UK. A stabilised hybrid between L. gracilidelineata subsp./var. gracilidelineata ‘Café au Lait’ and L. gracilidelineata subsp. brandbergensis, with an orange colour and intermittant features.
*’Buttermilk Valley’
*L. vallis-mariae ‘Buttermilk Valley’. The ‘Buttermilk Valley’ epithet was mentioned as a “provisional coinage” with double speech marks by Steven Hammer in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 9, p. 51 (1994) for white flowered variants. However, Steven used the epithet ‘Valley Girl’ when he published.
'Café au Lait'
Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Café au Lait'. First published by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995: 47-48, 1996”, originating from C309. Nomenclatural standard:  Photograph top right on page 129 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A patterned fuscous cultivar described by Steven Hammer as having “whipped cream islands floating on a cappuccino sea”.NB. ‘Café au Lait’ was discovered as a wild specimen by the Coles but not named by them.
'Cesky Granat'
Lithops otzeniana 'Cesky Granat'. First published by Petr Pavelka in “Lithops otzeniana Nel a jeho kultivary do ech, Kaktusy 37(1): 27-29. 2001”, originating from Mr. Hejtmanek. Nomenclatural standard:  Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. The name is Czech for “Czech garnet”. A stabilised red bodied aberration.
*’Christinae’
*L. schwantesii ’Christinae’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 221 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 332 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Christinae’ is not distinct from L. schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis.
*’Chartreuse’
*L. marmorata var. marmorata ‘Chartreuse’. An epithet used for this green bodied cultivar by Steven Hammer in Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. However, at that time Steven was unaware that the originator, Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic, had already chosen the epithet of ‘Polepsky Smaragd’. Synonym of ‘Polepsky Smaragd'.
'Chieruby’
Lithops aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis 'Chieruby’. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole and Naureen Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 93. 2005”, originating from Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph bottom right on page 93 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 2005, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. It was named after Mr. Shimada’s wife whose name is Chie(ruby). An orange-red bodied cultivar.

*'Chocolate Puddles'
*L. aucampiae 'Chocolate Puddles'. Plants with this title have been shown on the Internet and appear to relate to open windowed specimens. There has however been no official publication. An unaccepted epithet.
'Chocolate Sprinkles’
Lithops terricolor 'Chocolate Sprinkles’. First published by Bernd Schlösser in “Lithops terricolor 'Chocolate Sprinkles'": Mesemb. Study Group Buletin 31(1): 15. (January) 2016”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue, figure 31.16 on page 17, taken by Bernd Schlősser of Germany. A brown bodied cultivar.

*'Choc Top'
*L. hookeri var. dabneri 'Choc Top'. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 1997 seed list with no description, numbered F070. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*’Chrysocephala’
*L. julii ‘Chrysocephala’. This Latin based epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 24(1) pp.3-4 (2009), numbered 2386. Further, and as recorded on page 332 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Chrysocephala’ is not distinct from L. julii subsp. julii.
*'Corona'
*L. aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Corona'. Appeared in "Katakana script" under a photograph at the bottom of page 81 of The Genus Lithops by Yasuhiko Shimada (2001), with no apparent description. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
‘Daikangyoku’
Lithops salicola ‘Daikangyoku’. First published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi in “Succulents (Volume 1): 221. 2004”. Image example:  Photograph accompanying the protologue bottom right, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. A cultivar with a fine netting pattern on its face.
'Dintergreen'
Lithops dinteri subsp. dinteri var. dinteri 'Dintergreen'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops Flowering Stones:113. 1988”, originating from Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA. Image example: Photograph top right on page 113 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Diutina
*L. marmorata ’Diutina’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 219 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 333 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Diutina’ is not distinct from L. marmorata var. marmorata.
*’Dragon
*L. karasmontana subsp. L. bella ’Dragon’. This epithet (given as a "protocultivar") together with a photograph, appeared on the website of Francois Hoes of Belgium http://users.skynet.be/fhoes/rsasucculents/ in the section entitled "Lithops species pictures 2007", without a written description. *'Dragon' is not distinct from L. karasmontana subsp. bella.
‘Embers’
Lithops bromfieldii var. glaudinae ‘Embers’. First published by Keith Green in “Two new Lithops cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 21(2): 42, 2006”, originating from Steven Hammer of the USA. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue figure 21.19, taken by Keith Green of New Malden, England. The epithet *‘Rubroroseus’ was offered by Frik du Plooy on his 1997 seed list without a description, but he subsequently indicated (personal comment) it pertained to the same plants. Latinised names not previously published in accordance with the International Code for algae, fungi and plants (ICN) are not to be used for new cultivars. A deep red bodied cultivar.
‘Envy’
Lithops hookeri var. hookeri 'Envy '. This was published by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld:73. 1999”, although it stated there “yet to make its general debut”, suggesting the plants were scarce. NB. I erroneously considered this to have been established by Steven Hammer in Piante Grasse Speciale 1995 and reported such in my original Lithops Scrapbook notes which are available at www.scrapbooklithops.com, Lithops Scrapbook 1 download, on page 20. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue on page 71, Figure 111, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Erniana
*L. karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii ’Erniana’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 218 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 334 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Erniana’ is not distinct from L. karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii.
'Ernst's Witkop'
Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata 'Ernst's Witkop'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 129-130. 1988”, originating from Ernst Fritz. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 147 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 2005. A stabilised white flowering aberration, with normal body colours and flowers that are larger than ‘Fritz’s White Lady’.
*’Farinosa’
*L. pseudotruncatella subsp. dendritica ’Farinosa’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 220 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 334 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Farinosa’ is not distinct from L. pseudotruncatella subsp. dendritica.
*’Fenestrata’
*L. karasmontana subsp. bella ‘Fenestrata’. This Latin based epithet that had never previously been used in relation to this species or subspecies, appeared in the 2013 on-line catalogue of Conos Paradise numbered L14-91, but without a description. An unaccepted epithet.
*’Fenestrata’
*L. otzeniana ‘Fenestrata’. This appeared in the book Succulents (Volume 1), on page 221, 2004, published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi, with a photograph and description in Japanese. However, this Latin based epithet had never previously been used in relation to this species. An unaccepted epithet.
*’Firebrandt’
*L. aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Firebrandt’. Erroneously named by Keith Green in “Two new Lithops cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 21(2): 42, 2006”, before he realised the originator of this cultivar, Jossie Brandt of South Africa, had expressed a wish for it to be called ‘Rudesheim Ruby’. A corrective article appeared in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 25, p. 105 (2010). Synonym of ‘Rudesheim Ruby.
*’Flavivirens’
*L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis ‘Flavivirens’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy October 2011 seed list with no description. An unaccepted epithet.
‘Freckled Friend’
Lithops amicorum ‘Freckled Friend’. First published by Tok Schoeman in “Lithops: A New Pattern Bred Cultivar, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 24(3): 47. (July) 2009”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue taken by Tok Schoeman of Windhoek, Namibia. A reticulated patterned cultivar.
‘Fred’s Redhead’
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Fred’s Redhead’. First published by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 48, 69. 1996”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph figure 151 on page 83 of Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 1999, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A bright red bodied cultivar.
*’Fred's Redhorn’
*L. lesliei ‘Fred's Redhorn’. Plants with this title have been offered on the internet as a Steven Hammer cross of 'Fred's Redhead' with L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. hornii. There has however been no official publication. An unaccepted epithet.
'Fritz's White Lady'
Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. waldroniae 'Fritz's White Lady'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 130. 1998”, originating from Ernst Fritz. Image example: Photograph top left on page 131 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised white flowering aberration, with normal body colours and flowers that are smaller than ‘Ernst’s Witkop’.
'Fullergreen'
Lithops julii subsp. fulleri var. fulleri 'Fullergreen'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 150. 1988”. Image example: Photograph mid left on page 150 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Golden Beryl’
*L. aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Golden Beryl’. An epithet suggested by Steven Hammer in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 7, p. 65 (1992) for the then developing strain of yellow flowering, green bodied cultivars that become ‘Jackson’s Jade’. Synonym of ‘Jackson’s Jade’.
*'Green’
*L. dinteri subsp. multipunctata ‘Green’. Appeared (as not available) on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F030 (cultivated Shimada). Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*'Green’
*L. terricolor ‘Green’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F192 "Springbokvlakte", which is the same origin as 'Green Sandpoort'. An unaccepted epithet.
*'Green Attempts'
*L. otzeniana 'Green Attempts'. Seed offered by MESA Garden as "green attempts" numbered 1686.12 has become known by some as *'Green Attempts', which has never been described. In any case the name suggests "an attempt" rather than a stabilisation. An unaccepted epithet.
‘Green Diamond’
Lithops hermetica ‘Green Diamond’. First published by Professor Desmond Cole and Naureen Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 165. 2005”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph top page 165 accompanying the protologue. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Green Hooker’
*L. hookeri ‘Green Hooker’. The ‘Green Hooker’ epithet was mentioned as a “provisional coinage” without speech marks by Steven Hammer in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 9, p. 52 (1994), possibly for a single specimen and with no description. An unaccepted epithet.
‘Green Ivory’
Lithops pseudotruncatella subsp. pseudotruncatella var. riehmerae 'Green Ivory'. First published by Bernd Schlősser in “ 'Green Ivory' A New Lithops Cultivar, Mesemb. Study Group Buletin 29(4): 82. (October) 2014”. Image example: Photograph (Fig 29.108) accompanying the protologue taken by Bernd Schlősser of Dragon, Germany. A green bodied cultivar with a blue or turquoise tint.
‘Green River’
*L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis ‘Green River’. Erroneously named by Keith Green in “Lithops Scrapbook part 1: Cactus World, 25 (4), pp. 185-197 (2007)”, originating from Steven Hammer of the USA. In 2017 it became apparent that this epithet was used against the wishes of the originator, Mr. Louw Pretorius of South Africa. The correction was published in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 32, p. 47 (2017). Synonym of ‘Jewel of the Gariep’.
’Green Sandpoort’
Lithops terricolor ‘Green Sandpoort’. First published by Bernd Schlösser in “Green Speckles and Green Horns, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 28(4): 87. (October) 2013”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue on p.88, taken by Bernd Schlösser of Germany. A finely speckled green cultivar.
'Green Soapstone'
Lithops hallii var. ochracea 'Green Soapstone'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 134-135. 1988”, originating from Mrs M. E. Huysamen. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 134 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Greenberg’
*L. gracilidelineata subsp. brandbergensis ‘Greenberg’. Once offered by Vince Formosa of the now defunct “Parkways Lithops” without a description, from seed obtained from Frik du Plooy. Vince Formosa of Leeds (personal comment) once indicated that he intended to use this name for the green bodied aberration of subsp. brandbergensis, but was beaten to it by Steven Hammer. Synonym of ‘Vertigo’.
*’Greenchillii’
A name from Vincent Formosa that appeared without a description in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 13, p. 56 (1998), other than “fact or fiction the truth is out there”. An unaccepted epithet.
'Greenhorn'
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. hornii 'Greenhorn'. Published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 164. 1988”. Following successful propagation this was accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 96. 1999”. The plants were first noted by Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA. Image example: Kevin Mason of Carmarthen, Wales, photograph in www.scrapbooklithops.com, Lithops Scrapbook 1 download, on page 8. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Gunkanki’
*L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae 'Gunkanki'. *'GUNKANKI' was presented by Tony Sato in World Succulent Plants Colour Illustrated Dictionary 2004 on page 65, together with a photograph Fig 476 and the statement "long lines on the tops; yellow flowers". As L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae naturally has these features, the statement is not descriptive. Synonym of L. aucampiae subsp. euniceae.
*’Hammergray’
*L. meyeri 'Hammergray'. *'HAMMERGRAY' was presented by Tony Sato in World Succulent Plants Colour Illustrated Dictionary 2004 on page 76, together with a photograph Fig 567, and the statement "Gray leaves". As L. meyeri is naturally a grey plant, the statement is not descriptive. Synonym of L. meyeri.
'Hammeruby’
Lithops meyeri 'Hammeruby'. On the basis of a single specimen, this epithet was published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 173. 1988”, and following successful propagation, accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 89. 1999”. The originators of this cultivar were Steven Brack and Steven Hammer.  Image example: Photograph figure 160 on page 90 of Lithops -Treasures of the Veld 1999, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A stabilised red bodied aberration.
‘Hanawared’
Lithops gesinae var. annae ‘Hanawared’. First published by Yasuhiko Shimada in “International Succulent Institute Japan Newsletter 7(6): 1-2. 2005”. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. A red bodied cultivar.
‘Harlequin’
Lithops ‘Harlequin’. First published by Nick Rowlette of Portland, Oregon, USA, in “Lithops for the curious, the collector, and the cultist: 62. 1990”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops scrapbook: part 3’, Cactus World, 26 (2): pp. 81-85, p. 81 figure 1, 2008, taken by Lindsey Deaves of Surrey, England. A “greyish orange-brown” hybrid of L. julii subsp. julii X L. hallii var. ochracea.
'Hikoruby'
Lithops aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. euniceae 'Hikoruby'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole and Naureen Cole in “Lithops - Flowering stones: 90. 2005”, originating from Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph bottom right on page 91 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 2005, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. The name comes from the breeders Christian name (Yasu)hiko. An orange-red bodied cultivar.
*’Hillii’
*L. herreri ’Hillii’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 217 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 337 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Hillii’ is not distinct from L. geyeri (and is not a form of L. herreri).
'Hotlips'
Lithops julii subsp. julii 'Hotlips'. First published by Steven Hammer of the USA, in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 48, 69. 1996”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph on page 69 accompanying the protologue. A pallid cultivar with enhanced “lip-smears”, which are small patches along both margins of the fissure.
*’Inae’
*L. verruculosa ’Inae’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 221 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 337 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Inae’ is not distinct from L. verruculosa var. verruculosa.
*‘Incagold’
*L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Incagold’. Once offered by Vince Formosa of the now defunct “Parkways Lithops” without a description. Vince Formosa of Leeds (personal comment) once indicated that both the plants and *’Incagold’ epithet, were produced by crossing ‘Albinica’ with ‘Storms’s Albinigold’. The resultant plants were green bodied and flowered either white or yellow, being identical to one or other of the parents. White flowers are synonymous with ‘Albinica’ and yellow flowers are synonymous with ‘Storms’s Albinigold’.
'Ironstone'
Lithops karasmontana subsp. bella 'Ironstone’. First published by Tony Irons in “Ironstone Lithops, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 30(2): 48. (April) 2015“. Image example: Photograph of plants on page 50 accompanying the protologue, taken by Tony Irons of the UK. A stabilised cultivar with wide open brown windows and orange brown margins.
'Jackson’s Jade'
Lithops aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Jackson’s Jade'. First published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 7(4): 87. 1992”, originating from Tim Jackson of the USA. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph bottom right on page 85 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 2005, taken by Tim Jackson of Whitter, California, USA. The name *’Golden Beryl’ was once suggested for this cultivar by Steven Hammer in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 7, page 65, 1992, for the then developing strain of yellow flowering, green bodied aberrations that become ‘Jackson’s Jade’. A stabilised green bodied, yellow flowering aberration.
*’Jambouree’
*L. lesliei ‘Jambouree’. Plants with this title have been offered on the internet, on occasion even as "*L. lesiei 'Jambouree'". Specimens depicted appear to be identical to 'Fred's Redhead', and in any case there has been no publication. An unaccepted epithet.
*’Jeanetts Pearl’
*L. schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis ‘Jeanetts Pearl’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy October 2011 seed list with no description, next to the name Callie Nel. In the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 23 p.25 (2008) Ken Palmer stated that the white flowering aberration he referred to as *’Witspook’, was once known as *’Jeanett’s Pearl’ (with the ‘), but never established as such. An unaccepted epithet.
'Jewel of the Gariep'
Lithops aucampiae subsp. euniceae var. fluminalis ‘Jewel of the Gariep’. Erroneously named as *’Green River’ by Keith Green in “Lithops Scrapbook part 1: Cactus World, 25 (4), pp. 185-197 (2007)”, originating from Steven Hammer of the USA. In 2017 it became apparent that the originator, Mr. Louw Pretorius, had expressed a wish for the title of ‘Jewel of the Gariep’ to be used. The “Gariep” is the name used by indigenous people for the Orange River, and the correction was published in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 32(2) P.47 (2017). Nomenclatural standard: Photograph on page 188, figure 6 accompanying the protologue of *‘Green River’, taken by Norihiko Shimada of Japan. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
‘Kikukaseki’
Lithops ‘Kikukaseki’. First published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi in “Succulents(Volume 1): 222. (Jan) 2004”, originating from Yasuhiko Shimada. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. A hybrid of unknown exact parentage with deeply indented brown margins and white flowers.
‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’
Lithops ‘Kikusiyo Giyoku’. First published by Tony Sato of Japan in “Report of Contest, Japan Succulent Society. 1990 New Year Party in Tokyo, Cactus & Succulent Journal of Japan 4(6): 8. (Feb) 1990”, originating from Kisata Tanaka. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue. A hybrid of unknown exact origin with a chrysanthemum patterned face and white flowers.
*‘Kimbergreen’
*L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Kimbergreen’. This epithet together with a photograph, appeared on the website of Francois Hoes of Belgium http://users.shynet.be/fhoes/rsasucculents/ in the section entitled “Lithops species pictures list 2007", without a written description. Presumably this is a green bodied manifistation of the "Kimberly Form" of var. lesliei, although the rank of forma or form is not recognised in the Cole monographs. Synonym of 'Storm's Albinigold'.
‘Kosogyoku’
Lithops ‘Kosogyoku’. First published by Tony Sato of Japan in “Cactus & Succulent Journal of Japan 5(4): 11. (Dec) 1990”, originating from Kisata Tanaka. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue. A hybrid of unknown exact parentage with large white flowers, greyish shoulders and open reddish-brown facial windows.
*’Kuruman form’
*L. aucampiae ‘Kuruman form’. In 2011 this epithet (including a lower case "f") was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 215 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. The word "form" is not allowed in cultivar names, and as recorded on page 339 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Kuruman’ is not distinct from L. aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae.
’Lateritia’
Lithops karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana 'Lateritia'. Established by Steven Hammer in “Lithops Treasures of the Veld: 81. 1999”, originating from Kurt Dinter. Image example: Photograph figure 130 on page 78 of Lithops Treasures of the Veld: 2010, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A stabilised solid red faced var. karasmontana. NB. This Latin form epithet is retained as it is based on L. laterita (M.K. Dinter; 1928) which has subsequently become widely known and accepted as a cultivar.
‘Lava Flow’
Lithops ‘Lava Flow’. First published by Bernd Schlösser in “A New Named Hybrid in Lithops, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 27(1): 27-28. (February) 2012”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue, figure 27.33 on page 27, taken by Bernd Schlösser of, Germany. A hybrid of L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. tischeri X L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana that has strong rubrications.
‘Lerichegreen’
Lithops karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana ‘Lerichegreen’. First published by Professor Desmond Cole in “A New Aberrant Colour Form (Cultivar), Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 24(2): 31. (April) 2009”, originating from Klasie Geldenhuys. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue, taken by Naureen Cole of South Africa. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*‘Lime Ice’
*L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. aiaisensis ‘Lime Ice’. An epithet mentioned in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin V19, P39 (2004) by Steven Hammer, who then had obtained three specimens by chance when trying to raise more specimens of ‘Orange Ice’. It was however never described and no further information is currently available. Currently an unacceptable epithet.
'Limelight'
Lithops julii subsp. fulleri var. fulleri ' Limelight’. First published by Tok Schoeman in “Two New Lithops Cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 28(4): 76. (October) 2013“. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue on p. 77 taken by C. J. (Tok) Schoeman of Windhoek, Namibia. A lime green coloured cultivar.
*’Littlewoodii’
*L. julii ‘Littlewoodii’. This Latin based epithet appeared in the 2013 on-line catalogue of Conos Paradise numbered L63, but without a description. An unaccepted epithet.
*’Maculate’
*L. optica ‘Maculate’. This epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 24(1) pp.3-4 (2009), numbered 2392. This is a non-distinct local form of L. optica (see page 340 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005).
'Malachite'
Lithops salicola 'Malachite'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 193. 1988”, originating from Johann van Schalkwyk. Image example: Photograph of plant on page 193 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*‘Malasoap’
*L. ‘Malasoap’. An epithet mentioned by Lindsey Deaves on page 53 of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 27 (2012). In her article Lindsey assumes this to be a hybrid of L. hallii var. ochracea ‘Green Soapstone’ and L. salicola ‘Malachite’ that originated from Steven Hammer in 1992. No definitive description or photograph was given. Currently an unacceptable epithet.
*’Maraisii
*L. lesliei ’Maraisii’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 218 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 334 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Maraisii’ is not distinct from L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. venteri.
*’Margarethae
*L. vallis-mariae ’Margarethae’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 221 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 340 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Margarethae’ is not distinct from L. vallis-mariae.
*’Mickbergensis’
*L. karasmontana ‘Mickbergensis’. This Latin based epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 24(1) pp.3-4 (2009), numbered 2388. Further, and as recorded on page 341 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Mickbergensis’ is not distinct from L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana.
‘Moss Agate’
Lithops ‘Moss Agate’. First published by Jonathan Clark in “'Moss Agate' - A New Lithops Hybrid Cultivar, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 23(2): 31-33. (April) 2008”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue, taken by Jonathan Y. Clark of Bracknell, England. A hybrid of L. meyeri X L. geyeri that is L. meyeri shaped but darkened in the windows.
*‘Mundtii’
*L. pseudotruncatella ’Mundtii’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 219 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 333 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Mundtii’ is not distinct from L. pseudotruncatella subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella.
*'Murasaki'
*L. otzeniana 'Murasaki'. A photo with this title was shown on www.geocities.jp/axxrd09/otzeniana.htm . However, it is not clear how this is distinct from other specimens, and there appears to have been no official publication. An unaccepted epithet.
*‘Nelii’
*L. ruschiorum ’Nelii’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 220 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 342 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Nelii’ is not distinct from L. ruschiorum var. ruschiorum.
'Noemie's Kiwi’
Lithops bromfieldii var. bromfieldii 'Noemie's Kiwi’. First published by Ronny Feng in “’Noemie’s Kiwi’; A New Lithops Cultivar, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 31(4): 98. (October) 2016”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue taken by Ronny Feng of Qingdao City, China. Named after Mr. Feng's daughter, Noemie. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*’Nugget’
*L. aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Nugget’. This epithet appeared in the 2013 on-line catalogue of Conos Paradise numbered L2-79, but without a description. An unaccepted epithet.
'Nutwerk’
Lithops schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis 'Nutwerk’. First published by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 132-133. 1999”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 1’, Cactus World, 25 (4): pp. 185-197 p. 196 figure 23, 2007, taken by Clive Green of New Malden, England. A dark reticulate patterned cultivar.
*’Opalina’
*L. karasmontana ‘Opalina’. This epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 28(1) pp.5-7 (2013), numbered 2801. Although *’Opalina’ had also been mentioned as having a “kind of cultivar status” by Steven Hammer on page 81 of Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 1999, it is not distinct from L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana (see page 342 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005)).
‘Orange Ice’
Lithops karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. aiaisensis ‘Orange Ice’. First published by Terry Smale in “Seed Distribution 2007, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 22(1): 18. 2007”, originating from Steven Hammer. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ' Lithops Scrapbook part 2’, Cactus World, 26 (1): pp. 21-27 p.25, figure 10, 2008, taken by Terry Smale of Surrey, England. An orange faced cultivar.
*'Pale Yellow Flower'
*L. marmorata var. marmorata 'Pale Yellow Flower'. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 1997 seed list with no description, numbered F130a (ex Fritz). Currently an unacceptable epithet.
*’Pallida’
*L. julii ‘Pallida’. This Latin based epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 28(1) pp.5-7 (2013), numbered 2797. Further, and as recorded on page 343 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Pallida’ is not distinct from L. julii subsp. julii.
‘Pearl Blush’
Lithops divergens var. divergens ‘Pearl Blush’. First published by Steven Hammer in “Lithops Treasures of the Veld 2nd Edition: 117. 2010”, originating from Emile Heunis of South Africa. Image example: Photograph figure 238 on page 120 of Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 2010, taken by Emile Heunis of South Africa. A stabilised white flowering aberration, sometimes with pink petal tips.
*’Peersii’
*L. terricolor ’Peersii’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 221 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 343 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Peersii’ is not distinct from L. terricolor.
'Peppermint Crēme'
Lithops julii subsp. julii 'Peppermint Crēme'. On the basis of a single specimen, this epithet was published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 148. 1988”. Following successful propagation this was accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 77. 1999”. The originator of this cultivar was Lettie Pretorius. Image example: Photograph page 148 in Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised milky bluish-green bodied aberration.
*‘Peridot’
*L. coleorum ‘Peridot’. A suggested epithet mentioned by Lindsey Deaves on page 96 of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 26 (2011) for a “fine green form of L. coleorum... in the collection of Keith Green”. Currently an unacceptable epithet.
*'Pink’
*L. gesinae var. gesinae ‘Pink’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F045. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*'Pink’
*L. julii subsp. julii "Little Woodii" ‘Pink’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F087.1. An unaccepted epithet.
*'Pink'
*L. otzeniana 'Pink'. A photo with this title was shown on www.geocities.jp/axxrd09/otzeniana.htm . However, it is not clear how this is distinct from other specimens, and there appears to have been no official publication. An unaccepted epithet.
*‘Pink Flower’
*L. karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii ‘Pink Flower’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 1997 seed list with no description, numbered F103-1. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*‘Pink Localis’
*L. localis 'Pink Localis'. *'PINK LOCALIS' was presented by Tony Sato in World Succulent Plants Colour Illustrated Dictionary 2004 on page 75, together with a photograph Fig 556, and the statement "Red leaves: mutant". However, among other irregularities the photograph appears to show a normal L. terricolor. Synonym of L. terricolor.
*‘Pink Marmo’
*L. marmorata 'Pink Marmo'. *'PINK MARMO' was presented by Tony Sato in World Succulent Plants Colour Illustrated Dictionary 2004 on page 75, together with a photograph Fig 563, and the statement "Pink leaves". However, the photograph appears to show an overwatered plant suffering from sun-stress. Synonym of L. marmorata.
‘Pinky’
Lithops terricolor ‘Pinky’. First published by Bernd Schlösser in “Lithops terricolor 'Pinky', Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 23(2): 43. (April) 2008”. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Bernd Schlösser of Germany. A pink bodied cultivar.
'Polepsky Smaragd'
Lithops marmorata var. marmorata 'Polepsky Smaragd'. First published by Petr Pavelka in “Desatero Lithops (1), Cactaceae, etc. 6(1): 24, 26. 1996”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Petr Pavelka of the Czech Republic. ‘Polepsky Smaragd’ is the accepted name for *‘Chartreuse’ which was erroneously published by Steven Hammer in Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. The ‘Polepsky’ part of the epithet refers to the town Polepy where the plants were selected by Vladimir Vojacek, and ‘Smaragd’ is Czech for “emerald”. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
*‘Pulmonuncula’
*L. pseudotruncatella subsp. dendritica ’Pulmonuncula’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 220 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 343 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Pulmonuncula’ is not distinct from L. pseudotruncatella subsp. dendritica.
‘Purper’
Lithops karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii ‘Purper’. First published by Bernd Schlösser in “A New Red Lithops Cultivar, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 26(3): 57. (July) 2011”, originating from Frik du Plooy of South Africa. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Bernd Schlösser of Germany. A stabilised mauve-purple bodied aberration.
*'Red’
*L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. leicheana ‘Red’. Appeared (as not available) on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F100.1. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
'Red Olive'
Lithops olivacea var. nebrownii 'Red Olive'. Proposed by Steven Hammer in“Cultivated Cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 9(3): 51. 1994.”, and published by Steven in “A note on Lithops olivacea var. nebrownii cv. ‘Red Olive’, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Pinate Grasse 15(4): 50, 72. 1996”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue. A stabilised red bodied aberration.
‘Red Reticulata’
Lithops julii subsp. julii ‘Red Reticulata'. First published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi in “Succulents (Volume 1): 219. 2004”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue. A red reticulated patterned cultivar.
*'Rhona’
*L. karasmontana subsp. bella ‘Rhona’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F102.2. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
‘Rosary’
Lithops karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana ‘Rosary’. First published by Tony Sato in “Cactus & Succulent journal of Japan 12(3): 16. (Nov) 1997”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue by Tony Sato of Japan, reproduced in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 2’, Cactus World, 26(1): pp. 21-27 p.26, figure 11, 2008. A cultivar with multiple leaf sets.
'Rose of Texas'
Lithops verruculosa var. verruculosa 'Rose of Texas'. First published by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 49. 1995”, originating from Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph figure 194 on page 100 in Lithops - Treasures of the Veld, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A rose-pink flowered cultivar with either a normal or green body colour.
*’Ruberoid’
An epithet mentioned by Vince Formosa of Leeds, England, in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 13, p56 (1998) without any description. Vince Formosa of Leeds (personal comment) once indicated that this was a name he invented for red bodied, yellow flowering specimens of L. optica ‘Rubra’, and that he neither had the plants nor reliable knowledge of them at that time. An unaccepted epithet.
'Rubra'
Lithops optica 'Rubra'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 178-179. 1988”, originating from Hindrik de Boer of Holland. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 178 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised red bodied, white flowering aberration. NB. This Latin form epithet is retained as it is based on L. optica var. rubra (A. Tischer; 1926) which has subsequently become widely known and accepted as a cultivar.
‘Rubragold’
Lithops optica ‘Rubragold’. First published by Desmond and Naureen Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 251. 2005”, originating from Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph top right accompanying the protologue, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada. A stabilised red bodied, yellow flowered aberration
*’Rubroroseus’
*L. bromfieldii var. glaudinae ‘Rubroroseus’. Offered by Frik du Plooy on his 1997 seed list without a description, for excessively red specimens. Latinised epithets not previously published in accordance with the International Code for algae, fungi and plants (ICN) are not to be used for new cultivars, and this epithet is only included here as it has persisted with some growers. Synonym of ‘Embers’.
‘Ruby’
Lithops optica ‘Ruby’. First published by Nick Rowlette in “Lithops for the Curious, the Collector and the Cultist: 50. 1990”. Image example: Photograph FSG21 of plants in Lithops Archive (2010) [CD-ROM] Available: C.B. Dugdale / N. Rowlette (also available in Lithops Scrapbook II www.scrapbooklithops.com. A stabilised red bodied white flowering aberration of rapid growth.
‘Rudesheim Ruby’
Lithops aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae ‘Rudesheim Ruby’. First published (under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi) by Yashiko Shimada in the International Succulent Institute of Japan book, “Succulents (Volume 1): 217. 2004”, originating from Jossie Brandt of South Africa. Image example: photograph of plants accompanying the protologue. ‘Rudesheim Ruby’ is the accepted epithet for *‘Firebrandt’ which was erroneously used by Keith Green in “Two new Lithops cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 21(2): 42, 2006”, before he realised the originator of this cultivar, Jossie Brandt of South Africa, had expressed a wish for it to be called ‘Rudesheim Ruby’. A corrective article appeared in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 25, p. 105(2010). A red bodied cultivar.
'Sage Sun's Hairs -ZW-'
Lithops lesliei 'Sage Sun's Hairs -ZW-'. First published by Zhang Shijia and Wei Zichu in “A New Caespitose Cultivar: Lithops N.E.Br. Lesliei (N.E.Br.) N.E.Br. ‘Sage Sun’s Hairs @ZW’, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin: 29(2): 43. (April) 2014”. Nomenclatural Standard: Composite photograph of plants accompanying the protologue, figure 29.52 on page 42. Following consultation with the authors (husband and wife) the original epithet (*'SAGE SUN'S HAIRS @ZW') was corrected (see 'Cactus talk': New Lithops Cultivar registrations', Cactus World, 33 (2), p. 129), to conform to the rules of the Cultivated Plant Code (see Articles 21.18., 21.19. and 21.3. of the October 2009 edition). This epithet derives from a character in Chinese traditional literature called Sun Wukong, who could make copies of himself from each of his hairs. A rapidly clustering cultivar.
'Sato’s Violet'
Lithops salicola 'Sato’s Violet'. First published by Yasuhiko Shimada in “The genus Lithops: 172-173. 2001”, originating from Tony Sato. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 1’, Cactus World, 25 (4): pp. 185-197, page 195, figure 21, 2007, taken by Tutomu (Tony) Sato of Fukusima City, Japan. ‘Sato’s Violet’ is the accepted epithet for *‘Bacchus’ which was erroneously published by Steven Hammer on page 132 of Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 1999, before he realised the originator had expressed a wish to use the epithet ‘Sato’s Violet’. A stabilised lilac-purple bodied aberration.
'Shagreen'
Lithops schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. rugosa 'Shagreen'. First published by Terry Smale in “Seed Distribution 2013, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 28(1): 7. (January) 2013”, originating from Steven Hammer of the USA. Image example: Photograph top left in Lithops Scrapbook II available at www.scrapbooklithops.com., taken by Tok Schoeman of Windhoek, Namibia. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
'Shimada's Apricot'
Lithops hookeri var. marginata 'Shimada's Apricot'. First published by Yasuhiko Shimada in “A New Lithops Cultivar, Cactus and Succulent Journal (US) 72(6): 302 (1 Dec). 2000”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph accompanying the protologue and in The Genus Lithops,Shimada (2001. 122), taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. A bright plum-red bodied cultivar.
*’Signalberg’
*L. karasmontana ‘Signalberg’. This epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 23(1) pp.23-25, (2008), numbered 2279 but without a description. Further, and as recorded on page 345 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Signalberg’ is not distinct from L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana.
‘Silver Reed’
Lithops ruschiorum var. ruschiorum ‘Silver Reed’. First published by Professor Desmond Cole and Naureen Cole in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 274-275. 2005”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph bottom left on page 274 accompanying the protologue. A stabilised white flowering aberration with normal body colours. NB. Although the protologue makes reference to only 1 plant, the photograph clearly shows a reproducible group.
'Silver Spurs'
Lithops terricolor 'Silver Spurs'. On the basis of a single specimen, this epithet was published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 202. 1988”. Following successful propagation this was accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 87. 1999”, but under the species name of localis (which Steven Hammer considers to be the correct species name). The originator of this cultivar was Johann van Schalkwyk. Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 202 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A white flowering cultivar.
‘Silwersalm’
Lithops ‘Silwersalm’. First published by Tok Schoeman in “Two New Lithops Cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 28(4): 76. (October) 2013". Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue on p. 77 taken by C. J. (Tok) Schoeman of Windhoek, Namibia. A pink patterned hybrid with white flowers.
*'Sinshu Murasaki'
*L. otzeniana 'Sinshu Murasaki'. A photo with this title was shown on www.geocities.jp/axxrd09/otzeniana.htm . However, it is not clear how this is distinct from other specimens, and there appears to have been no official publication. An unaccepted epithet.
*‘Smokey Peach’
*L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. lericheana ‘Smokey Peach’. Once offered by Vincent Formosa of the now defunct “Parkways Lithops” without a description. Currently an unacceptable epithet.
‘Snow Fog’
Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata ‘Snow Fog’. First published by David Kao in “Lithops 'Snow Fog', A New Cultivar From China, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 30(1): 17. (January) 2015”. Nomenclatural Standard: Photograph (Fig 30.13) accompanying the protologue, taken by David Kao of Taiwan. An orange and white cultivar with lightning-bolt facial markings.
'Speckled Gold'
Lithops terricolor 'Speckled Gold'. On the basis of a single specimen, this epithet was published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 203. 1988”. Following successful propagation this was accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 87. 1999”, but under the species name of localis (which Steven Hammer considers to be the correct species name). Image example: Photograph top right on page 203 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised yellowish-green bodied aberration.
*‘Sperrgebiet’
*L. ‘Sperrgebiet’. Although not presented as a cultivar, this name was used by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 32(1) pp.10-12, (2017), numbered 3234. The description there stated; “ex Klasie Geldenhuys, said to be a new wild taxon but perhaps more likely to be a horticultural hybrid involving werneri or riehmerae?” As this could potentially appear in cultivar format on future seed lists, it is recorded here as an excluded name to avoid confusion. An unacceptable epithet.
'Splendido'
Lithops herrei 'Splendido'. First published by Giuseppe Maria Piccione in “A new cultivar in Lithops, Cactus and Succulent Journal (US) 73(2): 76. (Mar-April) 2001”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph of flowering plant accompanying the protologue, taken by Giuseppe Maria Piccione of Verona, Italy. A stabilised white flowering light green bodied aberration.
'Split Pea'
Lithops pseudotruncatella subsp. archerae 'Split Pea'. First published by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 47. 1996”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph figure 184 on page 97 in Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 1999, taken by Chris Barnhill of the, USA. A green bodied cultivar.
‘Springbloom’
Lithops pseudotruncatella  subsp. pseudotruncatella var. pseudotruncatella ‘Springbloom’. First published by Nick Rowlette in “Lithops for the Curious, the Collector and the Cultist: 52. 1990”. Image example: Photograph FSG9 of plants in Lithops Archive (2010) [CD-ROM]Available: C.B. Dugdale / N. Rowlette (also available in Lithops Scrapbook II www.scrapbooklithops.com). A cultivar with an early and, or multiple flowering habit.
‘Steamy Windows’
Lithops terricolor ‘Steamy Windows’. First published by Bernd Schlősser in “Lithops terricolor ‘Steamy Windows’, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 31(2): 33. (April) 2016”. Image example: Photograph (Fig 31.49) accompanying the protologue taken by Bernd Schlősser of Dragun, Germany. A white flowering cultivar with few or absent mini-windows.
'Storms's Albinigold'
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei 'Storms's Albinigold'. Published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 163. 1988”, originating from Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA. Image example: Photograph bottom left on page 219 in Lithops -Flowering Stones 2005. The name is a tribute to the late Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA, a much respected grower of Lithops. A stabilised green bodied yellow flowering aberration.
'Storms's Snowcap'
Lithops aucampiae subsp. aucampiae var. aucampiae 'Storms's Snowcap'. Published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 102. 1988”, originating from Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA.Image example: Photograph top left on page 83 in The genus Lithops 2001, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. The name is a tribute to the late Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA, a much respected grower of Lithops. A stabilised white flowering aberration with normal body colours.
*’Streyi’
*L. gracilidelineata ‘Streyi’. This Latin based epithet appeared in the book Succulents (Volume 1), on page 218, 2004, published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ), with a photograph and description in Japanese. It was also unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 25(1) pp.8-10, (2010), numbered 2476. Further, and as recorded on page 346 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Streyi’ is not distinct from L. gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata.
'Sulphurea'
Lithops bromfieldii var. insularis 'Sulphurea'. This was published as a cultivar by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones:108. 1988”, originating from Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. Image example: Photograph top right on page 108 of Lithops - Flowering Stones 1988. A stabilised green bodied aberration. NB. This Latin form epithet is retained as it is based on L. bromfieldii var. insularis f. sulphurea (Y. Shimada; 1977) which has subsequently become widely known and accepted as a cultivar.
‘Sunstone’
Lithops ‘Sunstone’. First published by Nick Rowlette in “Lithops for the curious, the collector, and the cultist: 61. 1990”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook: part 3’, Cactus World, 26 (2), pp. 81-85, page 84, figure 5, 2008, taken by Kevin Mason of Carmarthen, Wales.  A hybrid of L. karasmontana subsp. bella X L. karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana. Described by Kevin Mason of Wales (personal comment) as having “rusted iron coloured windows, with a metallic sheen”.
*‘Super Mac’
*L. salicola ‘Super Mac’. Appeared on the Frik du Plooy October 2011 seed list with no description, numbered F168.1. Currently an unacceptable epithet.
*’Swart Modder’
*L. fulviceps ‘Swart Modder’. Appeared in the book Succulents (Volume 1), on page 218, 2004, published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi, with a photograph and description in Japanese. However, it transpired this was the botanic variety correctly published according to the ICN by Professor Desmond Cole, and that the epithet should not be used. This is simply Lithops fulviceps var. laevigata.
*‘Syusingyoku’
*L. karasmontana 'Syusingyoku'. *'SYUSINGYOKU' was presented by Tony Sato in World Succulent Plants Colour Illustrated Dictionary 2004 on page 71, together with a photograph Fig 528, and the statement "Selected types: red tops". The statement does not distinguish *'Syusingyoku' from 'Lateritia'. Synonym of 'Lateritia'.
‘Talisman’
Lithops ‘Talisman’. First published by Nick Rowlette in “Lithops for the curious, the collector, and the cultist: 61. 1990”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 3’, Cactus World, 26 (2): pp. 81-85, page 85, figure 6, 2008”, taken by Francois Hoes of Belgium. A violet tinged reticulated hybrid of L. gesinae var. annae X L. gracilidelineata subsp. gracilidelineata var. gracilidelineata.
‘Top Red’
Lithops karasmontana subsp. karasmontana var. karasmontana ‘Top Red’. First published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi in “Succulents (Volume 1): 219. 2004”. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. A vibrant red mesh patterned cultivar.
*’Triebneri’
*L. schwantesii ’Triebneri’. In 2011 this epithet was presented in cultivar format by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) on page 221 of Succulents (Volume 2) compiled by Hiroshi Kobayashi and Mitsuo Ekuma. However, as recorded on page 347 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Triebneri’ is not distinct from L. schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. schwantesii.
*’Umdausensis’
*L. marmorata ‘Umdausensis’. This Latin based epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 28(1) pp.5-7 (2013), numbered 2807. Further, and as recorded on page 347 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Umdausensis’ is not distinct from L. marmorata var. marmorata.
‘Valley Girl'
Lithops vallis-mariae ‘Valley Girl'. First published by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops. Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 49. 1995”, originating from Jane Evans. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops scrapbook part 1’, Cactus World, 25 (4): pp. 185-197 (2007), page 196, figure 25, 2007, taken by Tim Jackson of the USA. The provisional epithet of *’Buttermilk Valley’ was rejected. A stabilised white flowering aberration with normal body colours.
‘Ventergreen’
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. venteri ‘Ventergreen’. First published by Yasuhiko Shimada in “Two new Lithops cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 21(4): 78-79. 2006”. Image example: Photograph accompanying the protologue, taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
'Verdigris'
Lithops verruculosa var. verruculosa 'Verdigris'. First published by Steven Hammer in “Lithops-Treasures of the veld:100, 111. 1999”. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph figure 195, on page 100 accompanying the protologue, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A green bodied aberration that has normal var. verruculosa flower colours.
*’Vermiculate’
*L. hookeri ‘Vermiculate’. This epithet was unintentionally published in cultivar format (personal comment) by Terry Smale in the “Seed Distribution List” of the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 24(1) pp.3-4 (2009). Further, and as recorded on page 348 of Lithops - Flowering Stones by DT & NA Cole (2005), *’Vermiculate’ is not distinct from L. hookeri var. hookeri.
‘Vertigo’
Lithops gracilidelineata subsp. brandbergensis ‘Vertigo’. First published by Steven Hammer in “Two new Lithops cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 18(3): 66. 2003”, originating from Frik du Plooy. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 2’, Cactus World, 26 (1): pp. 21-27 page 24, figure 8, 2008, taken by Kevin Mason of Carmarthen, Wales. The name is in reference to the wild habitat of subsp. brandbergensis on top of the Brandberg Mountains in Namibia, and also a “tongue-in-cheek” use of the word “vert” which is French for green. Vince Formosa of Leeds (personal comment) once indicated that he intended to use the name *‘Greenberg’ for this cultivar, but was beaten to it by Steven Hammer. A stabilised green bodied aberration.
'Violetta'
Lithops terricolor 'Violetta'. First published under the species name of localis (which he considers to be the correct species name) by Steven Hammer in “New Cultivars in Lithops, Piante Grasse Speciale 1995. Supplemento al n. 4 di Piante Grasse 15(4): 48. 1995”. Nomenclatural Standard: Photograph figure 115 on page 71 in Lithops - Treasures of the Veld 1999, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A reddish-violet bodied cultivar.
*‘Vivid Green’
*L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. lesliei ‘Vivid Green’. Once offered by Vince Formosa of the now defunct “Parkways Lithops” without a description. Vince Formosa of Leeds (personal comment) once indicated that this was a green bodied, white flowering plant identical to the first published ‘Albinica’, but originated from C5 a differing colony. A synonym of ‘Albinica’ (which originated from C36).
*‘Wheyward, Ho!’
*L. geyeri ‘Wheyward, Ho!’. Mentioned by Steven Hammer as a single white flowering specimen in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 31 (4) p.96 (2016). Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*‘White Flower’
*L. lesliei subsp. lesliei var. mariae ‘White Flower’. Mentioned as a single specimen in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 24 (1) p.14 (2009) with a photograph on page 5, but of dubious identification and probably a hybrid. An unaccepted epithet.
‘White Nymph’
Lithops bromfieldii var. bromfieldii ‘White Nymph’.  First published by Yasuhiko Shimada in “A new Lithops cultivar, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 17(3): 62. (July) 2002”. Nomenclatural Standard: Photograph of budding plant in The Genus Lithops, Shimada (2001. 87), taken by Yasuhiko Shimada of Japan and cited in the protologue. A stabilised white flowering aberration.
'White Queen'
Lithops pseudotruncatella subsp. pseudotruncatella var. elisabethiae 'White Queen'. First published by Hilde Mouton in “White Flowering Lithops pseudotruncatella subsp. pseudotruncatella var. elisabethiae, Mesemb. Study Group Bulletin 30(1): 18. (January) 2015”, originating from a habitat rescue. Image example: Photograph (Fig 30.10) accompanying the protologue, taken by Hilde Mouton of Keetmanshoop, Namibia. The epithet, a suggestion from Professor Desmond Cole, is a reference to Queen Elisabeth II of the UK. A stabilised white flowering aberration.
‘White Rabbit’
Lithops ‘White Rabbit’. First published by Eric Collins in “Lithops White Rabbit’, Cactus And Succulent Journal (of The Cactus and Succulent Society of New South Wales Inc.) 30(6): 105-107. (October to December) 2016”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue taken by Eric Collins of Snowtown, South Australia. A stabilised hybrid of unknown origin with a lightly marked, convex top and white flowers.
‘White Susan’
Lithops hookeri var. susannae ‘White Susan’. First published by Francois Hoes in “White Susan: A New Lithops Cultivar, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 31(4): 98. (October) 2016”. Image example: Photograph of plants accompanying the protologue taken by Francois Hoes of Belgium. A stabilised aberration that has white flowers with a yellow centre.
*’Whitfield’
*L. bromfieldii ‘Whitfield'. The ‘Whitfield’ epithet was mentioned as a “provisional coinage” without speech marks by Steven Hammer in the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 9, p. 51 (1994), pertaining to a single specimen and with no description. An unaccepted epithet.
'Witblom'
Lithops lesliei subsp. lesliei var. minor 'Witblom'. On the basis of a single specimen, this epithet was published by Professor Desmond Cole in “Some Lithops Cultivars, Aloe 22(3): 58-62. 1985”, and later appeared in “Lithops - Flowering Stones: 166: 1988”. Following successful propagation this was accepted and discussed as a cultivar by Steven Hammer in “Lithops - Treasures of the Veld: 85. 1999”. The originator of this cultivar was Professor Desmond Cole.  Image example: Photograph bottom right on page 225 in Lithops - Flowering Stones 2005. A stabilised white flowering aberration.
*‘Witspook’
*L. schwantesii subsp. schwantesii var. urikosensis ‘Witspook’. In the Mesemb Study Group Bulletin vol. 23 p.25 (2008) Ken Palmer states this white flowering aberration was once known as *’Jeanett’s Pearl’, but never established as such. Although Ken proposed the name of *‘Witspook’ in the same article, the cultivar was not then established because no plants were in existence at that time. An unaccepted epithet.
*'Yellow Green’
*L. gracilidelineata subsp. brandbergensis ‘Yellow Green’. Appeared (as not available) on the Frik du Plooy 2015 seed list with no description, numbered F052. This may not differ from 'Vertigo'. Currently an unaccepted epithet.
*’Yellow Green form’
*L. otzeniana ‘Yellow Green form’. The epithet (including a lower case “f”) with a photograph and a description in Japanese appeared in the book Succulents (Volume 1) on page 221, 2004, published by the International Succulent Institute of Japan (ISIJ) under the presidency of Hiroshi Kobayashi. The word “form” is not allowed in cultivar names. An unaccepted epithet.
*‘Zebra’
*L. karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii ‘Zebra’. Appeared on the January 2007 Mesa Garden seed list numbered 1625.763, with the description “prominent z stripes”. However, in an e-mail to Keith Green dated 13 June 2007, Steven Brack of Mesa Garden, New Mexico, USA, said the plants were not distinctive and should not have been published in cultivar format. This is simply Lithops karasmontana subsp. eberlanzii.
'Zorro'
Lithops dorotheae 'Zorro'. First published by Steven Hammer in “Two new Lithops cultivars, Mesemb Study Group Bulletin 18(3): 66. 2003”, originating from Ed Storms of Azle, Texas, USA. Nomenclatural standard: Photograph in ‘Lithops Scrapbook part 2’, Cactus World, 26 (1): pp. 21-27 page 23, figure 6, 2008, taken by Chris Barnhill of the USA. A lightning-bolt patterned cultivar.